God-El’s Theorem « Wonders from Your Torah
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God-El’s Theorem

“And God saw the light to be good.” The sages say that He saw that the primordial light was too good for this world and hid it in the Torah.

Learning Torah reveals the hidden light of creation, the light that shines from one end of the universe to the other instantaneously.

The primordial light of creation is not limited by c (the speed of physical light), it is a truly non-local phenomenon.

Einstein believed in an impersonal God. His friend Gödel (who had to flee from Nazi Germany for befriending Jews) believed in a personal God

Gödel was right (relative to Einstein, who considered him the greater). He even formulated an ontological proof of the existence of God.

In this day and age, in the academic world, you have to have guts to prove that God exists. Godel had guts, but starved himself to death.

His fame came from his proof that no theory of elementary arithmetic can be both complete and consistent. Only God and His Torah are both.

God and Torah can be both complete and consistent because their theorems cannot be listed by an “effective procedure” (computer program).

The theorems of the Torah are the 613 commandments with their infinite corollaries. There is no other and they are all consistent.

In our world of logic, if a system is consistent there must be at least one true theorem that is unprovable within the system: its creator.

Is Gödel God-El (El is one of God’s Names) by chance, or is there meaning in (the allusions of) a name. Rabbi Meir interpreted names.

Of course, we didn’t mean that Gödel was God! Just that he believed in God. El is the Name of God that Abraham taught the world.

In the messianic era (which we are now entering) hunger and thirst will not be for bread and water but for knowledge of God.

The longing for God has begun, amongst Jews and gentiles alike.

Hungry for God alone, Gödel feared being poisoned, he ate only what his wife prepared. When she fell ill he starved himself to death.

God is outside any logical system, so how did Gödel logically prove His existence? He did not know of God’s essence only of His appearance.

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