Of Unicorns and Men « Wonders from Your Torah
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Of Unicorns and Men

A corner is a point of nothing between two well defined directions, adiposity two somethings. You don't know what's awaiting you around the corner.

In Hebrew, "corner" is the same as "horn" and "ray," the rays of light that radiated from the face of Moses, who was always turning corners.

A square has corners, but not a circle. Creation/life is "a circle within a square," smooth, regular motion within sharp, sudden turns.

In English, corner and horn are cognate. They both derive from the Hebrew keren. The altar had horns on each of its corners.

Corner, turn, horn, keren all have a common "rn." In Hebrew, rn means a song of joy that rises from earth when evil has been annihilated.

Contemplate the 2 letter sub-root rn as standing for "right now"! Turn a corner, see the end of evil, and sing a song of joy - right now!

Jewish meditation is a serious endeavor but also a lot of fun. In Proverbs, King Solomon calls it "delights" and "games."
Consummate service of God unites meditation (919), diagnosis prayer (515), and action (415). They complement one another. Together, 1849 = 43^2.

Meditation connects mind to heart. Prayer connects heart to mouth. Action connects mouth (in the Torah speaking is action) to hands.

There is something special about hands. When lifted, they ascend above the head and when lowered they descend below the feet.

However important are meditation and prayer, the sages say that "Action is the most essential." Why? The greatest joy is in doing a mitzvah.

God created our inner world for the sake of rectifying our outer world. Maimonides teaches that the greatest of all joys is giving charity.

In giving charity everyone is happy, the giver, the receiver, and He who commanded us to give charity.

When our hand reaches out and opens to give it exceeds the power of our mind to comprehend and our feet to pursue a goal.

Our 10 fingers divide into 5 and 5, as do our 10 toes. 4 times 5^2 (each of the 5 reflecting all of the 5, inter-inclusion) = 100 = 10^2.

In Hebrew, each of the 5 fingers has a unique name. The sum of the 5 names = 1118 = "Hear O Israel, Havayah is our God, Havayah is one."

In small numbering (where every letter reduces to a number from 1 to 9), hand = 5 and foot = 8. Hand-hand foot-foot = 26, the Name Havayah.

Right-hand left-hand right-foot left-foot = 1456. The average value of the 4 is 364 = 14, hand, times 26, Havayah - "the hand of God."

The initial letters of "hand" "foot" = 15 (God's Name Yud-Hei) times 14, hand. The remaining letters spell "flag." Our flag is the Torah.

Flags are like tails, they wave back and forth. The dot-product of the 2 3-letter words "flag" and "tail" = 238 = hand, 14, times good, 17.

238 = Rachel. Her loving husband, Jacob = 182 = hand, 14, times love, 13. "Hand" is their highest common denominator. Hand, 14 = David.

Always keep your flag, the Torah, in hand. Wave it back and forth with Jewish pride. Though I am lowly, all together with Torah we're great.

By saying that we're great I mean to say that the Jewish People has been endowed with the greatest gift ever given to humanity, the Torah.

If we integrate the Torah into our beings and connect to one another with love, then we as a people are great. We have the potential.

The Torah calls Abraham great because he had a great heart, he expressed great love and kindness to all. He called himself "dust and ashes."
A horn is also a musical instrument, help beginning with the shofar, the crown of all musical instruments in the Torah.

Unicorns have one horn protruding from their forehead. They're always turning corners, always becoming nothing, so you'll never see one.

In the Bible, the re'eim is usually translated as unicorn and is said to have one horn. Its name means exalted one.

The sages speak of 3 1-horned animals: the ox Adam sacrificed; the tachash whose skin was used in the Tabernacle; the keresh, a wild deer.

The initials of keresh, re'eim, ox, tachash are the 4 last letters of the alef-bet which = 1000. The sum of all 4, 2055 = 15 times 137.

The Aramaic translation of dishon, the 5th of the 7 pure wild animals (corresponding to the emotive attribute of thanksgiving), is re'eim.

The ox that Adam sacrificed was a domestic animal, the keresh a wild animal. The sages were not sure regarding the many-colored tachash.

Building a sanctuary for God requires a once-in-a-lifetime experience (the tachash was a creation of the moment) of wild-domestic animation.

Daniel, in a prophetic vision, saw a "manifest horn" between the eyes of ferocious goat. The horn symbolized Alexander the Great.

Unicorn means one horn (corn = horn, as in corner). Something corny: There's a unicorn around the corner eating corn.

Someone asked, is there any source or allusion in the Torah to the non-Jewish notion that unicorns possess affinity to virgins?

We saw above that the 5th of the 7 pure wild animals of the Torah is a unicorn. Its sefirah, hod, means kingly splendor, alluding to 1 horn.

The Zohar says, "She is in hod." "She" refers to the virgin princess on her wedding day. She reflects queenly splendor, a single horn.

Under the wedding canopy a ray of light, a "horn," ascends from the head of the groom and the head of the bride.

In Kabbalah, the horn of the groom is called "the glory of the groom," and the horn of the bride is called "the glory of the bride."

The glory of the groom is the aura/horn above his head created by his love for his bride. The glory of the bride is her love for her groom.

The wedding canopy unites the two horns to become one. The two auras/horns of love merge together and ascend to heaven.

Love is expressed as both light and song. The horn symbolizes both. In the future we, the bride, will sing to God a new song.

The initials of "light" & "song" spell "fire." Fire shines light while singing a song of love. The remaining letters = "one" times "heart."

2 Responses to “Of Unicorns and Men”

  1. C. C. says:

    Thank you, Rabbi, for all of your teachings! And for this one which has brought a smile to my face! God bless you, Rabbi! Thank you for being here in the world at this time!

  2. Martin says:

    Hello Rabbi. I’m very interested in knowing a bit more about this 7 animals you mentioned in this text. What are they? what do they represent? do they appear only once?