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Jewish genealogy has become something of an art. There are many internet sites that can help you chart your family history and discover long-lost relatives you never knew about. Perhaps this penchant for family history begins with the list of Jewish family names that appears in Parashat Pinchas.

After a fatal epidemic struck the people in retribution for their iniquities, diagnosis God commanded Moses to take a census of each tribe, enumerating them by families.

The three divisions defining Jewish pedigree are the three Patriarchs—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—the twelve tribes (Jacob’s sons), and families, named after Jacob's grandsons and great-grandsons.

Although it might seem that Jewish pedigree depends solely on a male-paternal association, a little contemplation proves that the women play a very significant role as well, starting with the fact that being Jewish depends entirely on having a Jewish mother.

At the level of the Patriarchs, the Matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel, are mentioned in the Torah together with their husbands, and each took an active role in the birth of the Jewish people. Indeed, one synonym for a “people” (??????) is conjugate to “mother” (?????).

At the level of the twelve Tribes, the men come more obviously to the fore, and we indeed know very little about their wives.

At the level of families, although each family name is derived from one of Jacob's grandsons or great-grandsons names, each name receives a prefix and a suffix, which as we shall see, show that it is the feminine touch in the home that sets the spirit.

God’s Name

There is a well-known Torah teaching that, “When a man and a woman so merit, the Shechinah (Divine Presence) dwells between them, but if they do not, fire consumes them.” This idea is illustrated by the fact that “man” (?????) and “woman” (???????) both contain the letters of “fire” (????), however “man” contains an additional letter yud (?) and “woman” contains an additional letter hei (?). Together, these two letters form God’s Name pronounced “Kah” (??-?).

These same two letters are the letters that appear as the prefix and suffix to the family names mentioned in Parashat Pinchas. For example, Chanoch’s (???????) family is called “Hachanochi” (?????????). Here we see that the letter hei (?), the additional letter in “wife” comes first, and the yud (?) from “man” appears as the suffix letter. This indicates that the woman is indeed, the mainstay of the Jewish family.

The spiritual effects of intermarriage

The plague that struck the Jewish people was caused by forbidden relationships that began in the wilderness between Jewish men and non-Jewish women.

Regarding this sin, Maimonides writes:

Although this sin does not incur the death penalty, it should not be taken lightly. In fact, it has a disadvantage that no other illicit relationship carries like it. Because a child from an illicit relationship [with a Jewish woman] is his [the man's] child under all circumstances and is considered to be Jewish even though the child is a mamzer. But a child from a non-Jewish woman is not considered his child, as the verse states, “[You shall not intermarry with them…] For he will turn away your son from following Me,” this turns him away from following God.”

This is why the advice to someone born of such a relationship is that he/she convert to Judaism, thus redeeming their father’s lost spark.

Pinchas’ zealousness atoned for the Jewish people, ending the plague and revealing the true spark of spirituality in the Jewish family; a Jewish mother, a Jewish father and a Jewish family name.

Jewish genealogy has become something of an art. There are many internet sites that can help you chart your family history and discover long-lost relatives you never knew about. Perhaps this penchant for family history begins with the list of Jewish family names that appears in Parashat Pinchas.

After a fatal epidemic struck the people in retribution for their iniquities, diagnosis God commanded Moses to take a census of each tribe, enumerating them by families.

The three divisions defining Jewish pedigree are the three Patriarchs—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—the twelve tribes (Jacob’s sons), and families, named after Jacob's grandsons and great-grandsons.

Although it might seem that Jewish pedigree depends solely on a male-paternal association, a little contemplation proves that the women play a very significant role as well, starting with the fact that being Jewish depends entirely on having a Jewish mother.

At the level of the Patriarchs, the Matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel, are mentioned in the Torah together with their husbands, and each took an active role in the birth of the Jewish people. Indeed, one synonym for a “people” (??????) is conjugate to “mother” (?????).

At the level of the twelve Tribes, the men come more obviously to the fore, and we indeed know very little about their wives.

At the level of families, although each family name is derived from one of Jacob's grandsons or great-grandsons names, each name receives a prefix and a suffix, which as we shall see, show that it is the feminine touch in the home that sets the spirit.

God’s Name

There is a well-known Torah teaching that, “When a man and a woman so merit, the Shechinah (Divine Presence) dwells between them, but if they do not, fire consumes them.” This idea is illustrated by the fact that “man” (?????) and “woman” (???????) both contain the letters of “fire” (????), however “man” contains an additional letter yud (?) and “woman” contains an additional letter hei (?). Together, these two letters form God’s Name pronounced “Kah” (??-?).

These same two letters are the letters that appear as the prefix and suffix to the family names mentioned in Parashat Pinchas. For example, Chanoch’s (???????) family is called “Hachanochi” (?????????). Here we see that the letter hei (?), the additional letter in “wife” comes first, and the yud (?) from “man” appears as the suffix letter. This indicates that the woman is indeed, the mainstay of the Jewish family.

The spiritual effects of intermarriage

The plague that struck the Jewish people was caused by forbidden relationships that began in the wilderness between Jewish men and non-Jewish women.

Regarding this sin, Maimonides writes:

Although this sin does not incur the death penalty, it should not be taken lightly. In fact, it has a disadvantage that no other illicit relationship carries like it. Because a child from an illicit relationship [with a Jewish woman] is his [the man's] child under all circumstances and is considered to be Jewish even though the child is a mamzer. But a child from a non-Jewish woman is not considered his child, as the verse states, “[You shall not intermarry with them…] For he will turn away your son from following Me,” this turns him away from following God.”

This is why the advice to someone born of such a relationship is that he/she convert to Judaism, thus redeeming their father’s lost spark.

Pinchas’ zealousness atoned for the Jewish people, ending the plague and revealing the true spark of spirituality in the Jewish family; a Jewish mother, a Jewish father and a Jewish family name.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, health “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, try you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, sickness you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

Jewish genealogy has become something of an art. There are many internet sites that can help you chart your family history and discover long-lost relatives you never knew about. Perhaps this penchant for family history begins with the list of Jewish family names that appears in Parashat Pinchas.

After a fatal epidemic struck the people in retribution for their iniquities, diagnosis God commanded Moses to take a census of each tribe, enumerating them by families.

The three divisions defining Jewish pedigree are the three Patriarchs—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—the twelve tribes (Jacob’s sons), and families, named after Jacob's grandsons and great-grandsons.

Although it might seem that Jewish pedigree depends solely on a male-paternal association, a little contemplation proves that the women play a very significant role as well, starting with the fact that being Jewish depends entirely on having a Jewish mother.

At the level of the Patriarchs, the Matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel, are mentioned in the Torah together with their husbands, and each took an active role in the birth of the Jewish people. Indeed, one synonym for a “people” (??????) is conjugate to “mother” (?????).

At the level of the twelve Tribes, the men come more obviously to the fore, and we indeed know very little about their wives.

At the level of families, although each family name is derived from one of Jacob's grandsons or great-grandsons names, each name receives a prefix and a suffix, which as we shall see, show that it is the feminine touch in the home that sets the spirit.

God’s Name

There is a well-known Torah teaching that, “When a man and a woman so merit, the Shechinah (Divine Presence) dwells between them, but if they do not, fire consumes them.” This idea is illustrated by the fact that “man” (?????) and “woman” (???????) both contain the letters of “fire” (????), however “man” contains an additional letter yud (?) and “woman” contains an additional letter hei (?). Together, these two letters form God’s Name pronounced “Kah” (??-?).

These same two letters are the letters that appear as the prefix and suffix to the family names mentioned in Parashat Pinchas. For example, Chanoch’s (???????) family is called “Hachanochi” (?????????). Here we see that the letter hei (?), the additional letter in “wife” comes first, and the yud (?) from “man” appears as the suffix letter. This indicates that the woman is indeed, the mainstay of the Jewish family.

The spiritual effects of intermarriage

The plague that struck the Jewish people was caused by forbidden relationships that began in the wilderness between Jewish men and non-Jewish women.

Regarding this sin, Maimonides writes:

Although this sin does not incur the death penalty, it should not be taken lightly. In fact, it has a disadvantage that no other illicit relationship carries like it. Because a child from an illicit relationship [with a Jewish woman] is his [the man's] child under all circumstances and is considered to be Jewish even though the child is a mamzer. But a child from a non-Jewish woman is not considered his child, as the verse states, “[You shall not intermarry with them…] For he will turn away your son from following Me,” this turns him away from following God.”

This is why the advice to someone born of such a relationship is that he/she convert to Judaism, thus redeeming their father’s lost spark.

Pinchas’ zealousness atoned for the Jewish people, ending the plague and revealing the true spark of spirituality in the Jewish family; a Jewish mother, a Jewish father and a Jewish family name.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, health “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, try you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, sickness you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, patient “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

Jewish genealogy has become something of an art. There are many internet sites that can help you chart your family history and discover long-lost relatives you never knew about. Perhaps this penchant for family history begins with the list of Jewish family names that appears in Parashat Pinchas.

After a fatal epidemic struck the people in retribution for their iniquities, diagnosis God commanded Moses to take a census of each tribe, enumerating them by families.

The three divisions defining Jewish pedigree are the three Patriarchs—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—the twelve tribes (Jacob’s sons), and families, named after Jacob's grandsons and great-grandsons.

Although it might seem that Jewish pedigree depends solely on a male-paternal association, a little contemplation proves that the women play a very significant role as well, starting with the fact that being Jewish depends entirely on having a Jewish mother.

At the level of the Patriarchs, the Matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel, are mentioned in the Torah together with their husbands, and each took an active role in the birth of the Jewish people. Indeed, one synonym for a “people” (??????) is conjugate to “mother” (?????).

At the level of the twelve Tribes, the men come more obviously to the fore, and we indeed know very little about their wives.

At the level of families, although each family name is derived from one of Jacob's grandsons or great-grandsons names, each name receives a prefix and a suffix, which as we shall see, show that it is the feminine touch in the home that sets the spirit.

God’s Name

There is a well-known Torah teaching that, “When a man and a woman so merit, the Shechinah (Divine Presence) dwells between them, but if they do not, fire consumes them.” This idea is illustrated by the fact that “man” (?????) and “woman” (???????) both contain the letters of “fire” (????), however “man” contains an additional letter yud (?) and “woman” contains an additional letter hei (?). Together, these two letters form God’s Name pronounced “Kah” (??-?).

These same two letters are the letters that appear as the prefix and suffix to the family names mentioned in Parashat Pinchas. For example, Chanoch’s (???????) family is called “Hachanochi” (?????????). Here we see that the letter hei (?), the additional letter in “wife” comes first, and the yud (?) from “man” appears as the suffix letter. This indicates that the woman is indeed, the mainstay of the Jewish family.

The spiritual effects of intermarriage

The plague that struck the Jewish people was caused by forbidden relationships that began in the wilderness between Jewish men and non-Jewish women.

Regarding this sin, Maimonides writes:

Although this sin does not incur the death penalty, it should not be taken lightly. In fact, it has a disadvantage that no other illicit relationship carries like it. Because a child from an illicit relationship [with a Jewish woman] is his [the man's] child under all circumstances and is considered to be Jewish even though the child is a mamzer. But a child from a non-Jewish woman is not considered his child, as the verse states, “[You shall not intermarry with them…] For he will turn away your son from following Me,” this turns him away from following God.”

This is why the advice to someone born of such a relationship is that he/she convert to Judaism, thus redeeming their father’s lost spark.

Pinchas’ zealousness atoned for the Jewish people, ending the plague and revealing the true spark of spirituality in the Jewish family; a Jewish mother, a Jewish father and a Jewish family name.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, health “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, try you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, sickness you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, patient “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, there “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, decease you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, see you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

Jewish genealogy has become something of an art. There are many internet sites that can help you chart your family history and discover long-lost relatives you never knew about. Perhaps this penchant for family history begins with the list of Jewish family names that appears in Parashat Pinchas.

After a fatal epidemic struck the people in retribution for their iniquities, diagnosis God commanded Moses to take a census of each tribe, enumerating them by families.

The three divisions defining Jewish pedigree are the three Patriarchs—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—the twelve tribes (Jacob’s sons), and families, named after Jacob's grandsons and great-grandsons.

Although it might seem that Jewish pedigree depends solely on a male-paternal association, a little contemplation proves that the women play a very significant role as well, starting with the fact that being Jewish depends entirely on having a Jewish mother.

At the level of the Patriarchs, the Matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel, are mentioned in the Torah together with their husbands, and each took an active role in the birth of the Jewish people. Indeed, one synonym for a “people” (??????) is conjugate to “mother” (?????).

At the level of the twelve Tribes, the men come more obviously to the fore, and we indeed know very little about their wives.

At the level of families, although each family name is derived from one of Jacob's grandsons or great-grandsons names, each name receives a prefix and a suffix, which as we shall see, show that it is the feminine touch in the home that sets the spirit.

God’s Name

There is a well-known Torah teaching that, “When a man and a woman so merit, the Shechinah (Divine Presence) dwells between them, but if they do not, fire consumes them.” This idea is illustrated by the fact that “man” (?????) and “woman” (???????) both contain the letters of “fire” (????), however “man” contains an additional letter yud (?) and “woman” contains an additional letter hei (?). Together, these two letters form God’s Name pronounced “Kah” (??-?).

These same two letters are the letters that appear as the prefix and suffix to the family names mentioned in Parashat Pinchas. For example, Chanoch’s (???????) family is called “Hachanochi” (?????????). Here we see that the letter hei (?), the additional letter in “wife” comes first, and the yud (?) from “man” appears as the suffix letter. This indicates that the woman is indeed, the mainstay of the Jewish family.

The spiritual effects of intermarriage

The plague that struck the Jewish people was caused by forbidden relationships that began in the wilderness between Jewish men and non-Jewish women.

Regarding this sin, Maimonides writes:

Although this sin does not incur the death penalty, it should not be taken lightly. In fact, it has a disadvantage that no other illicit relationship carries like it. Because a child from an illicit relationship [with a Jewish woman] is his [the man's] child under all circumstances and is considered to be Jewish even though the child is a mamzer. But a child from a non-Jewish woman is not considered his child, as the verse states, “[You shall not intermarry with them…] For he will turn away your son from following Me,” this turns him away from following God.”

This is why the advice to someone born of such a relationship is that he/she convert to Judaism, thus redeeming their father’s lost spark.

Pinchas’ zealousness atoned for the Jewish people, ending the plague and revealing the true spark of spirituality in the Jewish family; a Jewish mother, a Jewish father and a Jewish family name.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, health “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, try you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, sickness you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, patient “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, there “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, decease you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, see you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

In the final book of the Pentateuch, look Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), thumb Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

Jewish genealogy has become something of an art. There are many internet sites that can help you chart your family history and discover long-lost relatives you never knew about. Perhaps this penchant for family history begins with the list of Jewish family names that appears in Parashat Pinchas.

After a fatal epidemic struck the people in retribution for their iniquities, diagnosis God commanded Moses to take a census of each tribe, enumerating them by families.

The three divisions defining Jewish pedigree are the three Patriarchs—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—the twelve tribes (Jacob’s sons), and families, named after Jacob's grandsons and great-grandsons.

Although it might seem that Jewish pedigree depends solely on a male-paternal association, a little contemplation proves that the women play a very significant role as well, starting with the fact that being Jewish depends entirely on having a Jewish mother.

At the level of the Patriarchs, the Matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel, are mentioned in the Torah together with their husbands, and each took an active role in the birth of the Jewish people. Indeed, one synonym for a “people” (??????) is conjugate to “mother” (?????).

At the level of the twelve Tribes, the men come more obviously to the fore, and we indeed know very little about their wives.

At the level of families, although each family name is derived from one of Jacob's grandsons or great-grandsons names, each name receives a prefix and a suffix, which as we shall see, show that it is the feminine touch in the home that sets the spirit.

God’s Name

There is a well-known Torah teaching that, “When a man and a woman so merit, the Shechinah (Divine Presence) dwells between them, but if they do not, fire consumes them.” This idea is illustrated by the fact that “man” (?????) and “woman” (???????) both contain the letters of “fire” (????), however “man” contains an additional letter yud (?) and “woman” contains an additional letter hei (?). Together, these two letters form God’s Name pronounced “Kah” (??-?).

These same two letters are the letters that appear as the prefix and suffix to the family names mentioned in Parashat Pinchas. For example, Chanoch’s (???????) family is called “Hachanochi” (?????????). Here we see that the letter hei (?), the additional letter in “wife” comes first, and the yud (?) from “man” appears as the suffix letter. This indicates that the woman is indeed, the mainstay of the Jewish family.

The spiritual effects of intermarriage

The plague that struck the Jewish people was caused by forbidden relationships that began in the wilderness between Jewish men and non-Jewish women.

Regarding this sin, Maimonides writes:

Although this sin does not incur the death penalty, it should not be taken lightly. In fact, it has a disadvantage that no other illicit relationship carries like it. Because a child from an illicit relationship [with a Jewish woman] is his [the man's] child under all circumstances and is considered to be Jewish even though the child is a mamzer. But a child from a non-Jewish woman is not considered his child, as the verse states, “[You shall not intermarry with them…] For he will turn away your son from following Me,” this turns him away from following God.”

This is why the advice to someone born of such a relationship is that he/she convert to Judaism, thus redeeming their father’s lost spark.

Pinchas’ zealousness atoned for the Jewish people, ending the plague and revealing the true spark of spirituality in the Jewish family; a Jewish mother, a Jewish father and a Jewish family name.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, health “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, try you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, sickness you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, patient “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, there “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, decease you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, see you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

In the final book of the Pentateuch, look Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), thumb Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, viagra sale healing Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), stuff sale Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, unhealthy meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

Jewish genealogy has become something of an art. There are many internet sites that can help you chart your family history and discover long-lost relatives you never knew about. Perhaps this penchant for family history begins with the list of Jewish family names that appears in Parashat Pinchas.

After a fatal epidemic struck the people in retribution for their iniquities, diagnosis God commanded Moses to take a census of each tribe, enumerating them by families.

The three divisions defining Jewish pedigree are the three Patriarchs—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—the twelve tribes (Jacob’s sons), and families, named after Jacob's grandsons and great-grandsons.

Although it might seem that Jewish pedigree depends solely on a male-paternal association, a little contemplation proves that the women play a very significant role as well, starting with the fact that being Jewish depends entirely on having a Jewish mother.

At the level of the Patriarchs, the Matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel, are mentioned in the Torah together with their husbands, and each took an active role in the birth of the Jewish people. Indeed, one synonym for a “people” (??????) is conjugate to “mother” (?????).

At the level of the twelve Tribes, the men come more obviously to the fore, and we indeed know very little about their wives.

At the level of families, although each family name is derived from one of Jacob's grandsons or great-grandsons names, each name receives a prefix and a suffix, which as we shall see, show that it is the feminine touch in the home that sets the spirit.

God’s Name

There is a well-known Torah teaching that, “When a man and a woman so merit, the Shechinah (Divine Presence) dwells between them, but if they do not, fire consumes them.” This idea is illustrated by the fact that “man” (?????) and “woman” (???????) both contain the letters of “fire” (????), however “man” contains an additional letter yud (?) and “woman” contains an additional letter hei (?). Together, these two letters form God’s Name pronounced “Kah” (??-?).

These same two letters are the letters that appear as the prefix and suffix to the family names mentioned in Parashat Pinchas. For example, Chanoch’s (???????) family is called “Hachanochi” (?????????). Here we see that the letter hei (?), the additional letter in “wife” comes first, and the yud (?) from “man” appears as the suffix letter. This indicates that the woman is indeed, the mainstay of the Jewish family.

The spiritual effects of intermarriage

The plague that struck the Jewish people was caused by forbidden relationships that began in the wilderness between Jewish men and non-Jewish women.

Regarding this sin, Maimonides writes:

Although this sin does not incur the death penalty, it should not be taken lightly. In fact, it has a disadvantage that no other illicit relationship carries like it. Because a child from an illicit relationship [with a Jewish woman] is his [the man's] child under all circumstances and is considered to be Jewish even though the child is a mamzer. But a child from a non-Jewish woman is not considered his child, as the verse states, “[You shall not intermarry with them…] For he will turn away your son from following Me,” this turns him away from following God.”

This is why the advice to someone born of such a relationship is that he/she convert to Judaism, thus redeeming their father’s lost spark.

Pinchas’ zealousness atoned for the Jewish people, ending the plague and revealing the true spark of spirituality in the Jewish family; a Jewish mother, a Jewish father and a Jewish family name.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, health “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, try you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, sickness you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, patient “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, there “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, decease you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, see you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

In the final book of the Pentateuch, look Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), thumb Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, viagra sale healing Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), stuff sale Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, unhealthy meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, seek Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), buy viagra Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

Jewish genealogy has become something of an art. There are many internet sites that can help you chart your family history and discover long-lost relatives you never knew about. Perhaps this penchant for family history begins with the list of Jewish family names that appears in Parashat Pinchas.

After a fatal epidemic struck the people in retribution for their iniquities, diagnosis God commanded Moses to take a census of each tribe, enumerating them by families.

The three divisions defining Jewish pedigree are the three Patriarchs—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—the twelve tribes (Jacob’s sons), and families, named after Jacob's grandsons and great-grandsons.

Although it might seem that Jewish pedigree depends solely on a male-paternal association, a little contemplation proves that the women play a very significant role as well, starting with the fact that being Jewish depends entirely on having a Jewish mother.

At the level of the Patriarchs, the Matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel, are mentioned in the Torah together with their husbands, and each took an active role in the birth of the Jewish people. Indeed, one synonym for a “people” (??????) is conjugate to “mother” (?????).

At the level of the twelve Tribes, the men come more obviously to the fore, and we indeed know very little about their wives.

At the level of families, although each family name is derived from one of Jacob's grandsons or great-grandsons names, each name receives a prefix and a suffix, which as we shall see, show that it is the feminine touch in the home that sets the spirit.

God’s Name

There is a well-known Torah teaching that, “When a man and a woman so merit, the Shechinah (Divine Presence) dwells between them, but if they do not, fire consumes them.” This idea is illustrated by the fact that “man” (?????) and “woman” (???????) both contain the letters of “fire” (????), however “man” contains an additional letter yud (?) and “woman” contains an additional letter hei (?). Together, these two letters form God’s Name pronounced “Kah” (??-?).

These same two letters are the letters that appear as the prefix and suffix to the family names mentioned in Parashat Pinchas. For example, Chanoch’s (???????) family is called “Hachanochi” (?????????). Here we see that the letter hei (?), the additional letter in “wife” comes first, and the yud (?) from “man” appears as the suffix letter. This indicates that the woman is indeed, the mainstay of the Jewish family.

The spiritual effects of intermarriage

The plague that struck the Jewish people was caused by forbidden relationships that began in the wilderness between Jewish men and non-Jewish women.

Regarding this sin, Maimonides writes:

Although this sin does not incur the death penalty, it should not be taken lightly. In fact, it has a disadvantage that no other illicit relationship carries like it. Because a child from an illicit relationship [with a Jewish woman] is his [the man's] child under all circumstances and is considered to be Jewish even though the child is a mamzer. But a child from a non-Jewish woman is not considered his child, as the verse states, “[You shall not intermarry with them…] For he will turn away your son from following Me,” this turns him away from following God.”

This is why the advice to someone born of such a relationship is that he/she convert to Judaism, thus redeeming their father’s lost spark.

Pinchas’ zealousness atoned for the Jewish people, ending the plague and revealing the true spark of spirituality in the Jewish family; a Jewish mother, a Jewish father and a Jewish family name.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, health “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, try you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, sickness you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, patient “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, there “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, decease you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, see you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

In the final book of the Pentateuch, look Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), thumb Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, viagra sale healing Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), stuff sale Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, unhealthy meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, seek Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), buy viagra Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, online Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), malady Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

Jewish genealogy has become something of an art. There are many internet sites that can help you chart your family history and discover long-lost relatives you never knew about. Perhaps this penchant for family history begins with the list of Jewish family names that appears in Parashat Pinchas.

After a fatal epidemic struck the people in retribution for their iniquities, diagnosis God commanded Moses to take a census of each tribe, enumerating them by families.

The three divisions defining Jewish pedigree are the three Patriarchs—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—the twelve tribes (Jacob’s sons), and families, named after Jacob's grandsons and great-grandsons.

Although it might seem that Jewish pedigree depends solely on a male-paternal association, a little contemplation proves that the women play a very significant role as well, starting with the fact that being Jewish depends entirely on having a Jewish mother.

At the level of the Patriarchs, the Matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel, are mentioned in the Torah together with their husbands, and each took an active role in the birth of the Jewish people. Indeed, one synonym for a “people” (??????) is conjugate to “mother” (?????).

At the level of the twelve Tribes, the men come more obviously to the fore, and we indeed know very little about their wives.

At the level of families, although each family name is derived from one of Jacob's grandsons or great-grandsons names, each name receives a prefix and a suffix, which as we shall see, show that it is the feminine touch in the home that sets the spirit.

God’s Name

There is a well-known Torah teaching that, “When a man and a woman so merit, the Shechinah (Divine Presence) dwells between them, but if they do not, fire consumes them.” This idea is illustrated by the fact that “man” (?????) and “woman” (???????) both contain the letters of “fire” (????), however “man” contains an additional letter yud (?) and “woman” contains an additional letter hei (?). Together, these two letters form God’s Name pronounced “Kah” (??-?).

These same two letters are the letters that appear as the prefix and suffix to the family names mentioned in Parashat Pinchas. For example, Chanoch’s (???????) family is called “Hachanochi” (?????????). Here we see that the letter hei (?), the additional letter in “wife” comes first, and the yud (?) from “man” appears as the suffix letter. This indicates that the woman is indeed, the mainstay of the Jewish family.

The spiritual effects of intermarriage

The plague that struck the Jewish people was caused by forbidden relationships that began in the wilderness between Jewish men and non-Jewish women.

Regarding this sin, Maimonides writes:

Although this sin does not incur the death penalty, it should not be taken lightly. In fact, it has a disadvantage that no other illicit relationship carries like it. Because a child from an illicit relationship [with a Jewish woman] is his [the man's] child under all circumstances and is considered to be Jewish even though the child is a mamzer. But a child from a non-Jewish woman is not considered his child, as the verse states, “[You shall not intermarry with them…] For he will turn away your son from following Me,” this turns him away from following God.”

This is why the advice to someone born of such a relationship is that he/she convert to Judaism, thus redeeming their father’s lost spark.

Pinchas’ zealousness atoned for the Jewish people, ending the plague and revealing the true spark of spirituality in the Jewish family; a Jewish mother, a Jewish father and a Jewish family name.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, health “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, try you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, sickness you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, patient “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, there “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, decease you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, see you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

In the final book of the Pentateuch, look Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), thumb Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, viagra sale healing Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), stuff sale Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, unhealthy meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, seek Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), buy viagra Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, online Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), malady Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the past, viagra the Jewish people had the privilege of hosting God’s Presence in the Temple in Jerusalem. Unfortunately, ambulance we lost that privilege and twice the Temple was destroyed, sickness both times on Tisha B’av—the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av—a day considered the low point of the Hebrew calendar. The Shabbat that follows the ninth of Av is known as the Shabbat of Comfort (??????? ???????), when God consoles us with the words, “Be comforted, be comforted, My people.” And, the fifteenth of Av, just six days later, is one of the two most joyous days of the year. How can we be expected to make such a quick rebound from the lowest point of the year to one of its most joyful days in such a short span of time?

To understand the paradox of mourning and joy, we need a Chassidic story…

The Seer of Lublin’s new student

When Rebbe Moshe Teitelbaum became acquainted with the Chassidic lifestyle, he found it difficult to understand how Chassidim could always be so joyful even though there is an explicit law in the Shulchan Aruch that states that every God-fearing Jew should always mourn over the destruction of the Temple. Rebbe Moshe decided to put his question to the Seer of Lublin, who was renowned for his ability to see far and deep into the depths of an individual’s heart and into his future. Rebbe Moshe turned to God in prayer before he set out on his journey to the Seer and requested that when he arrived at the Seer’s residence, the tzadik would answer his query. As soon as Rebbe Moshe entered the Seer’s room, before he had said a word, the Seer asked him, “Why are you looking so glum today? True, the Shulchan Aruch states that a God-fearing Jew should express sorrow… but the Chovot Halevavot states, ‘Joy is on my face and mourning within me.’ Believe me, continued the Seer, I also say the Midnight Lament (??????? ??????) weeping in grief. Nonetheless, I do so with joy. This is the way we were taught by our holy Rebbe, Reb Shmelkee of Nikolsburg, from the parable about a king who was taken captive in a distant land and went to visit one of his loyal friends. When his friend saw the king in captivity, he wept uncontrollably, nonetheless, he still rejoiced in having the king reside with him. The moral is clear, that we too should rejoice that the Divine Presence dwells with us in exile.”

When we look at this parable from the Almighty’s point of view, we discover a profound truth, He too is in great sorrow for descending into the captivity of exile, nonetheless, when He sees that the Jewish people are loyal to His ways and are happy to host His presence, He too rejoices with us. Where exactly is it that we host God’s Presence after the Temple’s destruction? In our hearts! The sages explain that from the day the Temple was destroyed, the Almighty has only the four halachic cubits defining each individual’s space to call His own. The private space of every Jew can, in a way, host the Divine Presence as the Temple did.

So, both God and the Jewish people are happy on the outside even as they weep within the depths of their hearts. This is one of the deep secrets of the Zohar, which teaches us that, “Weeping should be marked on one side of the heart and joy marked on the other.” When we reveal our joy, the weeping and sadness are hidden within us but at moments of deep sorrow, like on Tisha B’av and during the Midnight Lament, our sorrow becomes apparent. But, even at that moment, when we weep uncontrollably over the destruction, there is joy hidden on the other side of our heart, joy in that the King of Kings dwells with us in our sorrow.

Jewish genealogy has become something of an art. There are many internet sites that can help you chart your family history and discover long-lost relatives you never knew about. Perhaps this penchant for family history begins with the list of Jewish family names that appears in Parashat Pinchas.

After a fatal epidemic struck the people in retribution for their iniquities, diagnosis God commanded Moses to take a census of each tribe, enumerating them by families.

The three divisions defining Jewish pedigree are the three Patriarchs—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—the twelve tribes (Jacob’s sons), and families, named after Jacob's grandsons and great-grandsons.

Although it might seem that Jewish pedigree depends solely on a male-paternal association, a little contemplation proves that the women play a very significant role as well, starting with the fact that being Jewish depends entirely on having a Jewish mother.

At the level of the Patriarchs, the Matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel, are mentioned in the Torah together with their husbands, and each took an active role in the birth of the Jewish people. Indeed, one synonym for a “people” (??????) is conjugate to “mother” (?????).

At the level of the twelve Tribes, the men come more obviously to the fore, and we indeed know very little about their wives.

At the level of families, although each family name is derived from one of Jacob's grandsons or great-grandsons names, each name receives a prefix and a suffix, which as we shall see, show that it is the feminine touch in the home that sets the spirit.

God’s Name

There is a well-known Torah teaching that, “When a man and a woman so merit, the Shechinah (Divine Presence) dwells between them, but if they do not, fire consumes them.” This idea is illustrated by the fact that “man” (?????) and “woman” (???????) both contain the letters of “fire” (????), however “man” contains an additional letter yud (?) and “woman” contains an additional letter hei (?). Together, these two letters form God’s Name pronounced “Kah” (??-?).

These same two letters are the letters that appear as the prefix and suffix to the family names mentioned in Parashat Pinchas. For example, Chanoch’s (???????) family is called “Hachanochi” (?????????). Here we see that the letter hei (?), the additional letter in “wife” comes first, and the yud (?) from “man” appears as the suffix letter. This indicates that the woman is indeed, the mainstay of the Jewish family.

The spiritual effects of intermarriage

The plague that struck the Jewish people was caused by forbidden relationships that began in the wilderness between Jewish men and non-Jewish women.

Regarding this sin, Maimonides writes:

Although this sin does not incur the death penalty, it should not be taken lightly. In fact, it has a disadvantage that no other illicit relationship carries like it. Because a child from an illicit relationship [with a Jewish woman] is his [the man's] child under all circumstances and is considered to be Jewish even though the child is a mamzer. But a child from a non-Jewish woman is not considered his child, as the verse states, “[You shall not intermarry with them…] For he will turn away your son from following Me,” this turns him away from following God.”

This is why the advice to someone born of such a relationship is that he/she convert to Judaism, thus redeeming their father’s lost spark.

Pinchas’ zealousness atoned for the Jewish people, ending the plague and revealing the true spark of spirituality in the Jewish family; a Jewish mother, a Jewish father and a Jewish family name.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, health “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, try you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, sickness you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, patient “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, there “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, decease you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, see you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

In the final book of the Pentateuch, look Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), thumb Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, viagra sale healing Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), stuff sale Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, unhealthy meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, seek Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), buy viagra Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, online Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), malady Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the past, viagra the Jewish people had the privilege of hosting God’s Presence in the Temple in Jerusalem. Unfortunately, ambulance we lost that privilege and twice the Temple was destroyed, sickness both times on Tisha B’av—the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av—a day considered the low point of the Hebrew calendar. The Shabbat that follows the ninth of Av is known as the Shabbat of Comfort (??????? ???????), when God consoles us with the words, “Be comforted, be comforted, My people.” And, the fifteenth of Av, just six days later, is one of the two most joyous days of the year. How can we be expected to make such a quick rebound from the lowest point of the year to one of its most joyful days in such a short span of time?

To understand the paradox of mourning and joy, we need a Chassidic story…

The Seer of Lublin’s new student

When Rebbe Moshe Teitelbaum became acquainted with the Chassidic lifestyle, he found it difficult to understand how Chassidim could always be so joyful even though there is an explicit law in the Shulchan Aruch that states that every God-fearing Jew should always mourn over the destruction of the Temple. Rebbe Moshe decided to put his question to the Seer of Lublin, who was renowned for his ability to see far and deep into the depths of an individual’s heart and into his future. Rebbe Moshe turned to God in prayer before he set out on his journey to the Seer and requested that when he arrived at the Seer’s residence, the tzadik would answer his query. As soon as Rebbe Moshe entered the Seer’s room, before he had said a word, the Seer asked him, “Why are you looking so glum today? True, the Shulchan Aruch states that a God-fearing Jew should express sorrow… but the Chovot Halevavot states, ‘Joy is on my face and mourning within me.’ Believe me, continued the Seer, I also say the Midnight Lament (??????? ??????) weeping in grief. Nonetheless, I do so with joy. This is the way we were taught by our holy Rebbe, Reb Shmelkee of Nikolsburg, from the parable about a king who was taken captive in a distant land and went to visit one of his loyal friends. When his friend saw the king in captivity, he wept uncontrollably, nonetheless, he still rejoiced in having the king reside with him. The moral is clear, that we too should rejoice that the Divine Presence dwells with us in exile.”

When we look at this parable from the Almighty’s point of view, we discover a profound truth, He too is in great sorrow for descending into the captivity of exile, nonetheless, when He sees that the Jewish people are loyal to His ways and are happy to host His presence, He too rejoices with us. Where exactly is it that we host God’s Presence after the Temple’s destruction? In our hearts! The sages explain that from the day the Temple was destroyed, the Almighty has only the four halachic cubits defining each individual’s space to call His own. The private space of every Jew can, in a way, host the Divine Presence as the Temple did.

So, both God and the Jewish people are happy on the outside even as they weep within the depths of their hearts. This is one of the deep secrets of the Zohar, which teaches us that, “Weeping should be marked on one side of the heart and joy marked on the other.” When we reveal our joy, the weeping and sadness are hidden within us but at moments of deep sorrow, like on Tisha B’av and during the Midnight Lament, our sorrow becomes apparent. But, even at that moment, when we weep uncontrollably over the destruction, there is joy hidden on the other side of our heart, joy in that the King of Kings dwells with us in our sorrow.

In the past, there salve the Jewish people had the privilege of hosting God’s Presence in the Temple in Jerusalem. Unfortunately, advice we lost that privilege and twice the Temple was destroyed, both times on Tisha B’av—the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av—a day considered the low point of the Hebrew calendar. The Shabbat that follows the ninth of Av is known as the Shabbat of Comfort (??????? ???????), when God consoles us with the words, “Be comforted, be comforted, My people.” And, the fifteenth of Av, just six days later, is one of the two most joyous days of the year. How can we be expected to make such a quick rebound from the lowest point of the year to one of its most joyful days in such a short span of time?

To understand the paradox of mourning and joy, we need a Chassidic story…

The Seer of Lublin’s new student

When Rebbe Moshe Teitelbaum became acquainted with the Chassidic lifestyle, he found it difficult to understand how Chassidim could always be so joyful even though there is an explicit law in the Shulchan Aruch that states that every God-fearing Jew should always mourn over the destruction of the Temple. Rebbe Moshe decided to put his question to the Seer of Lublin, who was renowned for his ability to see far and deep into the depths of an individual’s heart and into his future. Rebbe Moshe turned to God in prayer before he set out on his journey to the Seer and requested that when he arrived at the Seer’s residence, the tzadik would answer his query. As soon as Rebbe Moshe entered the Seer’s room, before he had said a word, the Seer asked him, “Why are you looking so glum today? True, the Shulchan Aruch states that a God-fearing Jew should express sorrow… but the Chovot Halevavot states, ‘Joy is on my face and mourning within me.’ Believe me, continued the Seer, I also say the Midnight Lament (??????? ??????) weeping in grief. Nonetheless, I do so with joy. This is the way we were taught by our holy Rebbe, Reb Shmelkee of Nikolsburg, from the parable about a king who was taken captive in a distant land and went to visit one of his loyal friends. When his friend saw the king in captivity, he wept uncontrollably, nonetheless, he still rejoiced in having the king reside with him. The moral is clear, that we too should rejoice that the Divine Presence dwells with us in exile.”

When we look at this parable from the Almighty’s point of view, we discover a profound truth, He too is in great sorrow for descending into the captivity of exile, nonetheless, when He sees that the Jewish people are loyal to His ways and are happy to host His presence, He too rejoices with us. Where exactly is it that we host God’s Presence after the Temple’s destruction? In our hearts! The sages explain that from the day the Temple was destroyed, the Almighty has only the four halachic cubits defining each individual’s space to call his own. The private space of every Jew can, in a way, host the Divine Presence as the Temple did.

So, both God and the Jewish people are happy on the outside even as they weep within the depths of their hearts. This is one of the deep secrets of the Zohar, which teaches us that, “Weeping should be marked on one side of the heart and joy marked on the other.” When we reveal our joy, the weeping and sadness are hidden within us but at moments of deep sorrow, like on Tisha B’av and during the Midnight Lament, our sorrow becomes apparent. But, even at that moment, when we weep uncontrollably over the destruction, there is joy hidden on the other side of our heart, joy in that the King of Kings dwells with us in our sorrow.

Jewish genealogy has become something of an art. There are many internet sites that can help you chart your family history and discover long-lost relatives you never knew about. Perhaps this penchant for family history begins with the list of Jewish family names that appears in Parashat Pinchas.

After a fatal epidemic struck the people in retribution for their iniquities, diagnosis God commanded Moses to take a census of each tribe, enumerating them by families.

The three divisions defining Jewish pedigree are the three Patriarchs—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—the twelve tribes (Jacob’s sons), and families, named after Jacob's grandsons and great-grandsons.

Although it might seem that Jewish pedigree depends solely on a male-paternal association, a little contemplation proves that the women play a very significant role as well, starting with the fact that being Jewish depends entirely on having a Jewish mother.

At the level of the Patriarchs, the Matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel, are mentioned in the Torah together with their husbands, and each took an active role in the birth of the Jewish people. Indeed, one synonym for a “people” (??????) is conjugate to “mother” (?????).

At the level of the twelve Tribes, the men come more obviously to the fore, and we indeed know very little about their wives.

At the level of families, although each family name is derived from one of Jacob's grandsons or great-grandsons names, each name receives a prefix and a suffix, which as we shall see, show that it is the feminine touch in the home that sets the spirit.

God’s Name

There is a well-known Torah teaching that, “When a man and a woman so merit, the Shechinah (Divine Presence) dwells between them, but if they do not, fire consumes them.” This idea is illustrated by the fact that “man” (?????) and “woman” (???????) both contain the letters of “fire” (????), however “man” contains an additional letter yud (?) and “woman” contains an additional letter hei (?). Together, these two letters form God’s Name pronounced “Kah” (??-?).

These same two letters are the letters that appear as the prefix and suffix to the family names mentioned in Parashat Pinchas. For example, Chanoch’s (???????) family is called “Hachanochi” (?????????). Here we see that the letter hei (?), the additional letter in “wife” comes first, and the yud (?) from “man” appears as the suffix letter. This indicates that the woman is indeed, the mainstay of the Jewish family.

The spiritual effects of intermarriage

The plague that struck the Jewish people was caused by forbidden relationships that began in the wilderness between Jewish men and non-Jewish women.

Regarding this sin, Maimonides writes:

Although this sin does not incur the death penalty, it should not be taken lightly. In fact, it has a disadvantage that no other illicit relationship carries like it. Because a child from an illicit relationship [with a Jewish woman] is his [the man's] child under all circumstances and is considered to be Jewish even though the child is a mamzer. But a child from a non-Jewish woman is not considered his child, as the verse states, “[You shall not intermarry with them…] For he will turn away your son from following Me,” this turns him away from following God.”

This is why the advice to someone born of such a relationship is that he/she convert to Judaism, thus redeeming their father’s lost spark.

Pinchas’ zealousness atoned for the Jewish people, ending the plague and revealing the true spark of spirituality in the Jewish family; a Jewish mother, a Jewish father and a Jewish family name.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, health “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, try you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, sickness you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, patient “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, there “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, decease you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, see you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

In the final book of the Pentateuch, look Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), thumb Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, viagra sale healing Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), stuff sale Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, unhealthy meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, seek Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), buy viagra Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, online Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), malady Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the past, viagra the Jewish people had the privilege of hosting God’s Presence in the Temple in Jerusalem. Unfortunately, ambulance we lost that privilege and twice the Temple was destroyed, sickness both times on Tisha B’av—the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av—a day considered the low point of the Hebrew calendar. The Shabbat that follows the ninth of Av is known as the Shabbat of Comfort (??????? ???????), when God consoles us with the words, “Be comforted, be comforted, My people.” And, the fifteenth of Av, just six days later, is one of the two most joyous days of the year. How can we be expected to make such a quick rebound from the lowest point of the year to one of its most joyful days in such a short span of time?

To understand the paradox of mourning and joy, we need a Chassidic story…

The Seer of Lublin’s new student

When Rebbe Moshe Teitelbaum became acquainted with the Chassidic lifestyle, he found it difficult to understand how Chassidim could always be so joyful even though there is an explicit law in the Shulchan Aruch that states that every God-fearing Jew should always mourn over the destruction of the Temple. Rebbe Moshe decided to put his question to the Seer of Lublin, who was renowned for his ability to see far and deep into the depths of an individual’s heart and into his future. Rebbe Moshe turned to God in prayer before he set out on his journey to the Seer and requested that when he arrived at the Seer’s residence, the tzadik would answer his query. As soon as Rebbe Moshe entered the Seer’s room, before he had said a word, the Seer asked him, “Why are you looking so glum today? True, the Shulchan Aruch states that a God-fearing Jew should express sorrow… but the Chovot Halevavot states, ‘Joy is on my face and mourning within me.’ Believe me, continued the Seer, I also say the Midnight Lament (??????? ??????) weeping in grief. Nonetheless, I do so with joy. This is the way we were taught by our holy Rebbe, Reb Shmelkee of Nikolsburg, from the parable about a king who was taken captive in a distant land and went to visit one of his loyal friends. When his friend saw the king in captivity, he wept uncontrollably, nonetheless, he still rejoiced in having the king reside with him. The moral is clear, that we too should rejoice that the Divine Presence dwells with us in exile.”

When we look at this parable from the Almighty’s point of view, we discover a profound truth, He too is in great sorrow for descending into the captivity of exile, nonetheless, when He sees that the Jewish people are loyal to His ways and are happy to host His presence, He too rejoices with us. Where exactly is it that we host God’s Presence after the Temple’s destruction? In our hearts! The sages explain that from the day the Temple was destroyed, the Almighty has only the four halachic cubits defining each individual’s space to call His own. The private space of every Jew can, in a way, host the Divine Presence as the Temple did.

So, both God and the Jewish people are happy on the outside even as they weep within the depths of their hearts. This is one of the deep secrets of the Zohar, which teaches us that, “Weeping should be marked on one side of the heart and joy marked on the other.” When we reveal our joy, the weeping and sadness are hidden within us but at moments of deep sorrow, like on Tisha B’av and during the Midnight Lament, our sorrow becomes apparent. But, even at that moment, when we weep uncontrollably over the destruction, there is joy hidden on the other side of our heart, joy in that the King of Kings dwells with us in our sorrow.

In the past, there salve the Jewish people had the privilege of hosting God’s Presence in the Temple in Jerusalem. Unfortunately, advice we lost that privilege and twice the Temple was destroyed, both times on Tisha B’av—the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av—a day considered the low point of the Hebrew calendar. The Shabbat that follows the ninth of Av is known as the Shabbat of Comfort (??????? ???????), when God consoles us with the words, “Be comforted, be comforted, My people.” And, the fifteenth of Av, just six days later, is one of the two most joyous days of the year. How can we be expected to make such a quick rebound from the lowest point of the year to one of its most joyful days in such a short span of time?

To understand the paradox of mourning and joy, we need a Chassidic story…

The Seer of Lublin’s new student

When Rebbe Moshe Teitelbaum became acquainted with the Chassidic lifestyle, he found it difficult to understand how Chassidim could always be so joyful even though there is an explicit law in the Shulchan Aruch that states that every God-fearing Jew should always mourn over the destruction of the Temple. Rebbe Moshe decided to put his question to the Seer of Lublin, who was renowned for his ability to see far and deep into the depths of an individual’s heart and into his future. Rebbe Moshe turned to God in prayer before he set out on his journey to the Seer and requested that when he arrived at the Seer’s residence, the tzadik would answer his query. As soon as Rebbe Moshe entered the Seer’s room, before he had said a word, the Seer asked him, “Why are you looking so glum today? True, the Shulchan Aruch states that a God-fearing Jew should express sorrow… but the Chovot Halevavot states, ‘Joy is on my face and mourning within me.’ Believe me, continued the Seer, I also say the Midnight Lament (??????? ??????) weeping in grief. Nonetheless, I do so with joy. This is the way we were taught by our holy Rebbe, Reb Shmelkee of Nikolsburg, from the parable about a king who was taken captive in a distant land and went to visit one of his loyal friends. When his friend saw the king in captivity, he wept uncontrollably, nonetheless, he still rejoiced in having the king reside with him. The moral is clear, that we too should rejoice that the Divine Presence dwells with us in exile.”

When we look at this parable from the Almighty’s point of view, we discover a profound truth, He too is in great sorrow for descending into the captivity of exile, nonetheless, when He sees that the Jewish people are loyal to His ways and are happy to host His presence, He too rejoices with us. Where exactly is it that we host God’s Presence after the Temple’s destruction? In our hearts! The sages explain that from the day the Temple was destroyed, the Almighty has only the four halachic cubits defining each individual’s space to call his own. The private space of every Jew can, in a way, host the Divine Presence as the Temple did.

So, both God and the Jewish people are happy on the outside even as they weep within the depths of their hearts. This is one of the deep secrets of the Zohar, which teaches us that, “Weeping should be marked on one side of the heart and joy marked on the other.” When we reveal our joy, the weeping and sadness are hidden within us but at moments of deep sorrow, like on Tisha B’av and during the Midnight Lament, our sorrow becomes apparent. But, even at that moment, when we weep uncontrollably over the destruction, there is joy hidden on the other side of our heart, joy in that the King of Kings dwells with us in our sorrow.

In the past, sale the Jewish people had the privilege of hosting God’s Presence in the Temple in Jerusalem. Unfortunately, troche we lost that privilege and twice the Temple was destroyed, both times on Tisha B’av—the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av—a day considered the low point of the Hebrew calendar. The Shabbat that follows the ninth of Av is known as the Shabbat of Comfort (??????? ???????), when God consoles us with the words, “Be comforted, be comforted, My people.” And, the fifteenth of Av, just six days later, is one of the two most joyous days of the year. How can we be expected to make such a quick rebound from the lowest point of the year to one of its most joyful days in such a short span of time?

To understand the paradox of mourning and joy, we need a Chassidic story…

The Seer of Lublin’s new student

When Rebbe Moshe Teitelbaum became acquainted with the Chassidic lifestyle, he found it difficult to understand how Chassidim could always be so joyful even though there is an explicit law in the Shulchan Aruch that states that every God-fearing Jew should always mourn over the destruction of the Temple. Rebbe Moshe decided to put his question to the Seer of Lublin, who was renowned for his ability to see far and deep into the depths of an individual’s heart and into his future. Rebbe Moshe turned to God in prayer before he set out on his journey to the Seer and requested that when he arrived at the Seer’s residence, the tzadik would answer his query. As soon as Rebbe Moshe entered the Seer’s room, before he had said a word, the Seer asked him, “Why are you looking so glum today? True, the Shulchan Aruch states that a God-fearing Jew should express sorrow… but the Chovot Halevavot states, ‘Joy is on my face and mourning within me.’ Believe me, continued the Seer, I also say the Midnight Lament (??????? ??????) weeping in grief. Nonetheless, I do so with joy. This is the way we were taught by our holy Rebbe, Reb Shmelkee of Nikolsburg, from the parable about a king who was taken captive in a distant land and went to visit one of his loyal friends. When his friend saw the king in captivity, he wept uncontrollably, nonetheless, he still rejoiced in having the king reside with him. The moral is clear, that we too should rejoice that the Divine Presence dwells with us in exile.”

When we look at this parable from the Almighty’s point of view, we discover a profound truth, He too is in great sorrow for descending into the captivity of exile, nonetheless, when He sees that the Jewish people are loyal to His ways and are happy to host His presence, He too rejoices with us. Where exactly is it that we host God’s Presence after the Temple’s destruction? In our hearts! The sages explain that from the day the Temple was destroyed, the Almighty has only the four halachic cubits defining each individual’s space to call his own. The private space of every Jew can, in a way, host the Divine Presence as the Temple did.

So, both God and the Jewish people are happy on the outside even as they weep within the depths of their hearts. This is one of the deep secrets of the Zohar, which teaches us that, “Weeping should be marked on one side of the heart and joy marked on the other.” When we reveal our joy, the weeping and sadness are hidden within us but at moments of deep sorrow, like on Tisha B’av and during the Midnight Lament, our sorrow becomes apparent. But, even at that moment, when we weep uncontrollably over the destruction, there is joy hidden on the other side of our heart, joy in that the King of Kings dwells with us in our sorrow.

Jewish genealogy has become something of an art. There are many internet sites that can help you chart your family history and discover long-lost relatives you never knew about. Perhaps this penchant for family history begins with the list of Jewish family names that appears in Parashat Pinchas.

After a fatal epidemic struck the people in retribution for their iniquities, diagnosis God commanded Moses to take a census of each tribe, enumerating them by families.

The three divisions defining Jewish pedigree are the three Patriarchs—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob—the twelve tribes (Jacob’s sons), and families, named after Jacob's grandsons and great-grandsons.

Although it might seem that Jewish pedigree depends solely on a male-paternal association, a little contemplation proves that the women play a very significant role as well, starting with the fact that being Jewish depends entirely on having a Jewish mother.

At the level of the Patriarchs, the Matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel, are mentioned in the Torah together with their husbands, and each took an active role in the birth of the Jewish people. Indeed, one synonym for a “people” (??????) is conjugate to “mother” (?????).

At the level of the twelve Tribes, the men come more obviously to the fore, and we indeed know very little about their wives.

At the level of families, although each family name is derived from one of Jacob's grandsons or great-grandsons names, each name receives a prefix and a suffix, which as we shall see, show that it is the feminine touch in the home that sets the spirit.

God’s Name

There is a well-known Torah teaching that, “When a man and a woman so merit, the Shechinah (Divine Presence) dwells between them, but if they do not, fire consumes them.” This idea is illustrated by the fact that “man” (?????) and “woman” (???????) both contain the letters of “fire” (????), however “man” contains an additional letter yud (?) and “woman” contains an additional letter hei (?). Together, these two letters form God’s Name pronounced “Kah” (??-?).

These same two letters are the letters that appear as the prefix and suffix to the family names mentioned in Parashat Pinchas. For example, Chanoch’s (???????) family is called “Hachanochi” (?????????). Here we see that the letter hei (?), the additional letter in “wife” comes first, and the yud (?) from “man” appears as the suffix letter. This indicates that the woman is indeed, the mainstay of the Jewish family.

The spiritual effects of intermarriage

The plague that struck the Jewish people was caused by forbidden relationships that began in the wilderness between Jewish men and non-Jewish women.

Regarding this sin, Maimonides writes:

Although this sin does not incur the death penalty, it should not be taken lightly. In fact, it has a disadvantage that no other illicit relationship carries like it. Because a child from an illicit relationship [with a Jewish woman] is his [the man's] child under all circumstances and is considered to be Jewish even though the child is a mamzer. But a child from a non-Jewish woman is not considered his child, as the verse states, “[You shall not intermarry with them…] For he will turn away your son from following Me,” this turns him away from following God.”

This is why the advice to someone born of such a relationship is that he/she convert to Judaism, thus redeeming their father’s lost spark.

Pinchas’ zealousness atoned for the Jewish people, ending the plague and revealing the true spark of spirituality in the Jewish family; a Jewish mother, a Jewish father and a Jewish family name.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, health “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, try you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, sickness you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, patient “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

On the way to the Holy land

Last minute preparations are being made towards the Jewish people’s entry into the Promised Land. The excitement is building up as each tribe is about to be allocated their portion. The central directive that appeared in Parashat Pinchas is repeated in Parashat Masei, there “You shall give the Land as an inheritance to your families by lot; to the large, decease you shall give a larger inheritance and to the small you shall give a smaller inheritance; wherever the lot falls shall be his; according to the tribes of your fathers, see you shall inherit.”

The above verse presents two different methods of dividing the land: by lottery and by common-sense reasoning, according to the size of each tribe. The sages describe a third, intermediate method, via Divine spirit:

Elazar [the kohen] donned the urim vetumim and Joshua and the entire Jewish people stood before him. A ballot of the tribes and a ballot of the borders stood by him. He [Elazar] would predict the matches through Divine spirit [according to the urim vetumim] and say [for example], “Zevulun will be drawn and the border of Acre will be drawn with him.” He drew a lot from the tribes’ ballot and Zevulun was in hand, he drew a lot from the borders’ ballot and the border of Acre was in hand… and so it was for each and every tribe.

Common-sense, intuition, and faith

Before we see how these methods of dividing the land correspond to our current generation, we will first note their correspondence to three ways of serving God at three different levels of the psyche.

The first way of serving God is through action, by keeping His commandments. Our actions are governed by the intellect (??????), which judges which actions are permitted and which are forbidden according to Torah law. This corresponds to dividing the land relative to the size of the tribe, which is a common-sense concern.

The second way we serve God is by refining our emotions in a way that goes beyond keeping to the letter of the law. This we achieve by cultivating our intuition and by developing a sensitivity that comes from an inner knowledge (??????) of God. This way corresponds to dividing the land according to Divine spirit, through the urim vetumim, which lay upon Elazar’s heart.

The third and highest level of serving God is through faith (????????) and a dedication that is above all reason, so much so that we totally devote our life to Him. This manifests our direct connection to the Almighty and corresponds to dividing the land by a lottery, the results of which rely entirely on His will.

God gave this land to me

Now, there are three reasons why we should hold on to the land and not give even one millimeter of it to others. These three reasons similarly correspond to the three ways the land was divided when the Jewish people first crossed its borders.

The first reason is above all, the holiness of the land that God has given us. This reason corresponds to dividing the land by lottery. The land of Israel is our fortune, an indispensible part of our inherent Jewish faith.

The second reason is a more emotional one, the need to express our gratitude to the Almighty who has given us this land as our heritage; we cannot give away our beloved gift!

The third reason is the one the Lubavitcher Rebbe emphasized in particular: the security factor, which is pure common-sense.

Miraculously, the results of all three methods of dividing the land were absolutely identical, and so, whatever the reason for keeping the land, the results will always be the same: the whole land of Israel for the Jewish people.

In the final book of the Pentateuch, look Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), thumb Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, viagra sale healing Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), stuff sale Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, unhealthy meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, seek Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), buy viagra Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the final book of the Pentateuch, online Sefer Devarim (the book of Deuteronomy), malady Moses recounted the events that happened to the Jewish people following their Exodus from Egypt. Rashi explains that the places Moses mentioned allude to all the times when the Jewish people angered God, meaning that Moses’ recollection of their voyage through the wilderness was in fact a veiled rebuke.

Moses was not the first individual to rebuke those closest to him before his passing. Jacob’s stern rebuke to his first three sons as he lay on his death bed is one example. Yet, Jacob’s rebuke is actually referred to as a blessing, exactly like the overt blessings he bestowed upon his other sons.

How can a severe rebuke be considered a blessing?

The inside inlaid with love (??????? ?????? ???????)

The inner motivation of true rebuke is great love. This is true of a loving father, and is also true of the Almighty Himself, who rebukes us with love, as we find in Proverbs, “For he who God loves, He rebukes; like a father who cherishes his son.” Malbim explains:

Rebuke is a sign of love, because in His love He supervises over the individual to make sure he improves his way, and to elevate him to an infinitely higher level.

Loving parents know that they must rebuke their children for their own benefit, in order to educate them and refine their ways. In contrast, parents who do not rebuke their children at all only cause them harm, as we see from the tragic results of King David’s negligence in rebuking Adoniyah, his firstborn son, who tried to steal the crown at the end of David’s life and was subsequently put to death.

So, rebuke is actually the most eloquent expression of love! Indeed, “Better is revealed rebuke [when it comes] from hidden love.”

The idea that love is an integral component of rebuke is further alluded to in the word “rebuke” (?????????) itself. The first syllable means “within” (??????) and the second syllable (???) has a numerical value of 13, the same as “love” (???????), meaning that internally, heartfelt conscientious rebuke is motivated by love and the rebuke serves as a vessel for transferring this love.

From a more profound perspective, Chassidut teaches us that there are two levels of blessing. Normal blessings are visible and are spoken of openly in public, but there are special blessings that must remain concealed, even hidden within stern criticism. A hidden blessing actually emanates from a higher source than a blessing that is self-evident. This is why when the Almighty afflicts an individual with suffering, God forbid, he should accept it with joy. This joy comes from the profound realization that the affliction is a type of spiritual abundance that emanates from a very high source; from the concealed world that cannot be revealed in our world in the form of a blessing. As such, affliction is an even deeper expression of God’s closeness to us, “Happy is the man whom God afflicts.” This idea is certainly not an easy pill to swallow for the suffering individual, but, from an objective point of view we can understand how the rebuke itself is a blessing, like a father who says, “I love this defiant child so much, therefore I must scold him for his disobedience.”

In this way, Moses’ gentle, loving and compassionate rebuke of the Jewish people in the book of Deuteronomy is actually a blessing in disguise.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh’s class 15th Av 5772

In the past, viagra the Jewish people had the privilege of hosting God’s Presence in the Temple in Jerusalem. Unfortunately, ambulance we lost that privilege and twice the Temple was destroyed, sickness both times on Tisha B’av—the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av—a day considered the low point of the Hebrew calendar. The Shabbat that follows the ninth of Av is known as the Shabbat of Comfort (??????? ???????), when God consoles us with the words, “Be comforted, be comforted, My people.” And, the fifteenth of Av, just six days later, is one of the two most joyous days of the year. How can we be expected to make such a quick rebound from the lowest point of the year to one of its most joyful days in such a short span of time?

To understand the paradox of mourning and joy, we need a Chassidic story…

The Seer of Lublin’s new student

When Rebbe Moshe Teitelbaum became acquainted with the Chassidic lifestyle, he found it difficult to understand how Chassidim could always be so joyful even though there is an explicit law in the Shulchan Aruch that states that every God-fearing Jew should always mourn over the destruction of the Temple. Rebbe Moshe decided to put his question to the Seer of Lublin, who was renowned for his ability to see far and deep into the depths of an individual’s heart and into his future. Rebbe Moshe turned to God in prayer before he set out on his journey to the Seer and requested that when he arrived at the Seer’s residence, the tzadik would answer his query. As soon as Rebbe Moshe entered the Seer’s room, before he had said a word, the Seer asked him, “Why are you looking so glum today? True, the Shulchan Aruch states that a God-fearing Jew should express sorrow… but the Chovot Halevavot states, ‘Joy is on my face and mourning within me.’ Believe me, continued the Seer, I also say the Midnight Lament (??????? ??????) weeping in grief. Nonetheless, I do so with joy. This is the way we were taught by our holy Rebbe, Reb Shmelkee of Nikolsburg, from the parable about a king who was taken captive in a distant land and went to visit one of his loyal friends. When his friend saw the king in captivity, he wept uncontrollably, nonetheless, he still rejoiced in having the king reside with him. The moral is clear, that we too should rejoice that the Divine Presence dwells with us in exile.”

When we look at this parable from the Almighty’s point of view, we discover a profound truth, He too is in great sorrow for descending into the captivity of exile, nonetheless, when He sees that the Jewish people are loyal to His ways and are happy to host His presence, He too rejoices with us. Where exactly is it that we host God’s Presence after the Temple’s destruction? In our hearts! The sages explain that from the day the Temple was destroyed, the Almighty has only the four halachic cubits defining each individual’s space to call His own. The private space of every Jew can, in a way, host the Divine Presence as the Temple did.

So, both God and the Jewish people are happy on the outside even as they weep within the depths of their hearts. This is one of the deep secrets of the Zohar, which teaches us that, “Weeping should be marked on one side of the heart and joy marked on the other.” When we reveal our joy, the weeping and sadness are hidden within us but at moments of deep sorrow, like on Tisha B’av and during the Midnight Lament, our sorrow becomes apparent. But, even at that moment, when we weep uncontrollably over the destruction, there is joy hidden on the other side of our heart, joy in that the King of Kings dwells with us in our sorrow.

In the past, there salve the Jewish people had the privilege of hosting God’s Presence in the Temple in Jerusalem. Unfortunately, advice we lost that privilege and twice the Temple was destroyed, both times on Tisha B’av—the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av—a day considered the low point of the Hebrew calendar. The Shabbat that follows the ninth of Av is known as the Shabbat of Comfort (??????? ???????), when God consoles us with the words, “Be comforted, be comforted, My people.” And, the fifteenth of Av, just six days later, is one of the two most joyous days of the year. How can we be expected to make such a quick rebound from the lowest point of the year to one of its most joyful days in such a short span of time?

To understand the paradox of mourning and joy, we need a Chassidic story…

The Seer of Lublin’s new student

When Rebbe Moshe Teitelbaum became acquainted with the Chassidic lifestyle, he found it difficult to understand how Chassidim could always be so joyful even though there is an explicit law in the Shulchan Aruch that states that every God-fearing Jew should always mourn over the destruction of the Temple. Rebbe Moshe decided to put his question to the Seer of Lublin, who was renowned for his ability to see far and deep into the depths of an individual’s heart and into his future. Rebbe Moshe turned to God in prayer before he set out on his journey to the Seer and requested that when he arrived at the Seer’s residence, the tzadik would answer his query. As soon as Rebbe Moshe entered the Seer’s room, before he had said a word, the Seer asked him, “Why are you looking so glum today? True, the Shulchan Aruch states that a God-fearing Jew should express sorrow… but the Chovot Halevavot states, ‘Joy is on my face and mourning within me.’ Believe me, continued the Seer, I also say the Midnight Lament (??????? ??????) weeping in grief. Nonetheless, I do so with joy. This is the way we were taught by our holy Rebbe, Reb Shmelkee of Nikolsburg, from the parable about a king who was taken captive in a distant land and went to visit one of his loyal friends. When his friend saw the king in captivity, he wept uncontrollably, nonetheless, he still rejoiced in having the king reside with him. The moral is clear, that we too should rejoice that the Divine Presence dwells with us in exile.”

When we look at this parable from the Almighty’s point of view, we discover a profound truth, He too is in great sorrow for descending into the captivity of exile, nonetheless, when He sees that the Jewish people are loyal to His ways and are happy to host His presence, He too rejoices with us. Where exactly is it that we host God’s Presence after the Temple’s destruction? In our hearts! The sages explain that from the day the Temple was destroyed, the Almighty has only the four halachic cubits defining each individual’s space to call his own. The private space of every Jew can, in a way, host the Divine Presence as the Temple did.

So, both God and the Jewish people are happy on the outside even as they weep within the depths of their hearts. This is one of the deep secrets of the Zohar, which teaches us that, “Weeping should be marked on one side of the heart and joy marked on the other.” When we reveal our joy, the weeping and sadness are hidden within us but at moments of deep sorrow, like on Tisha B’av and during the Midnight Lament, our sorrow becomes apparent. But, even at that moment, when we weep uncontrollably over the destruction, there is joy hidden on the other side of our heart, joy in that the King of Kings dwells with us in our sorrow.

In the past, sale the Jewish people had the privilege of hosting God’s Presence in the Temple in Jerusalem. Unfortunately, troche we lost that privilege and twice the Temple was destroyed, both times on Tisha B’av—the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av—a day considered the low point of the Hebrew calendar. The Shabbat that follows the ninth of Av is known as the Shabbat of Comfort (??????? ???????), when God consoles us with the words, “Be comforted, be comforted, My people.” And, the fifteenth of Av, just six days later, is one of the two most joyous days of the year. How can we be expected to make such a quick rebound from the lowest point of the year to one of its most joyful days in such a short span of time?

To understand the paradox of mourning and joy, we need a Chassidic story…

The Seer of Lublin’s new student

When Rebbe Moshe Teitelbaum became acquainted with the Chassidic lifestyle, he found it difficult to understand how Chassidim could always be so joyful even though there is an explicit law in the Shulchan Aruch that states that every God-fearing Jew should always mourn over the destruction of the Temple. Rebbe Moshe decided to put his question to the Seer of Lublin, who was renowned for his ability to see far and deep into the depths of an individual’s heart and into his future. Rebbe Moshe turned to God in prayer before he set out on his journey to the Seer and requested that when he arrived at the Seer’s residence, the tzadik would answer his query. As soon as Rebbe Moshe entered the Seer’s room, before he had said a word, the Seer asked him, “Why are you looking so glum today? True, the Shulchan Aruch states that a God-fearing Jew should express sorrow… but the Chovot Halevavot states, ‘Joy is on my face and mourning within me.’ Believe me, continued the Seer, I also say the Midnight Lament (??????? ??????) weeping in grief. Nonetheless, I do so with joy. This is the way we were taught by our holy Rebbe, Reb Shmelkee of Nikolsburg, from the parable about a king who was taken captive in a distant land and went to visit one of his loyal friends. When his friend saw the king in captivity, he wept uncontrollably, nonetheless, he still rejoiced in having the king reside with him. The moral is clear, that we too should rejoice that the Divine Presence dwells with us in exile.”

When we look at this parable from the Almighty’s point of view, we discover a profound truth, He too is in great sorrow for descending into the captivity of exile, nonetheless, when He sees that the Jewish people are loyal to His ways and are happy to host His presence, He too rejoices with us. Where exactly is it that we host God’s Presence after the Temple’s destruction? In our hearts! The sages explain that from the day the Temple was destroyed, the Almighty has only the four halachic cubits defining each individual’s space to call his own. The private space of every Jew can, in a way, host the Divine Presence as the Temple did.

So, both God and the Jewish people are happy on the outside even as they weep within the depths of their hearts. This is one of the deep secrets of the Zohar, which teaches us that, “Weeping should be marked on one side of the heart and joy marked on the other.” When we reveal our joy, the weeping and sadness are hidden within us but at moments of deep sorrow, like on Tisha B’av and during the Midnight Lament, our sorrow becomes apparent. But, even at that moment, when we weep uncontrollably over the destruction, there is joy hidden on the other side of our heart, joy in that the King of Kings dwells with us in our sorrow.

In the past, patient
malady the Jewish people had the privilege of hosting God’s Presence in the Temple in Jerusalem. Unfortunately, buy
we lost that privilege and twice the Temple was destroyed, both times on Tisha B’av—the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av—a day considered the low point of the Hebrew calendar. The Shabbat that follows the ninth of Av is known as the Shabbat of Comfort (??????? ???????), when God consoles us with the words, “Be comforted, be comforted, My people.” And, the fifteenth of Av, just six days later, is one of the two most joyous days of the year. How can we be expected to make such a quick rebound from the lowest point of the year to one of its most joyful days in such a short span of time?

To understand the paradox of mourning and joy, we need a Chassidic story…

The Seer of Lublin’s new student

When Rebbe Moshe Teitelbaum became acquainted with the Chassidic lifestyle, he found it difficult to understand how Chassidim could always be so joyful even though there is an explicit law in the Shulchan Aruch that states that every God-fearing Jew should always mourn over the destruction of the Temple. Rebbe Moshe decided to put his question to the Seer of Lublin, who was renowned for his ability to see far and deep into the depths of an individual’s heart and into his future. Rebbe Moshe turned to God in prayer before he set out on his journey to the Seer and requested that when he arrived at the Seer’s residence, the tzadik would answer his query. As soon as Rebbe Moshe entered the Seer’s room, before he had said a word, the Seer asked him, “Why are you looking so glum today? True, the Shulchan Aruch states that a God-fearing Jew should express sorrow… but the Chovot Halevavot states, ‘Joy is on my face and mourning within me.’ Believe me, continued the Seer, I also say the Midnight Lament (??????? ??????) weeping in grief. Nonetheless, I do so with joy. This is the way we were taught by our holy Rebbe, Reb Shmelkee of Nikolsburg, from the parable about a king who was taken captive in a distant land and went to visit one of his loyal friends. When his friend saw the king in captivity, he wept uncontrollably, nonetheless, he still rejoiced in having the king reside with him. The moral is clear, that we too should rejoice that the Divine Presence dwells with us in exile.”

When we look at this parable from the Almighty’s point of view, we discover a profound truth, He too is in great sorrow for descending into the captivity of exile, nonetheless, when He sees that the Jewish people are loyal to His ways and are happy to host His presence, He too rejoices with us. Where exactly is it that we host God’s Presence after the Temple’s destruction? In our hearts! The sages explain that from the day the Temple was destroyed, the Almighty has only the four halachic cubits defining each individual’s space to call his own. The private space of every Jew can, in a way, host the Divine Presence as the Temple did.

So, both God and the Jewish people are happy on the outside even as they weep within the depths of their hearts. This is one of the deep secrets of the Zohar, which teaches us that, “Weeping should be marked on one side of the heart and joy marked on the other.” When we reveal our joy, the weeping and sadness are hidden within us but at moments of deep sorrow, like on Tisha B’av and during the Midnight Lament, our sorrow becomes apparent. But, even at that moment, when we weep uncontrollably over the destruction, there is joy hidden on the other side of our heart, joy in that the King of Kings dwells with us in our sorrow.

Tishah B’av has passed, more about and we have now entered the seven weeks of consolation, healing seven weeks in which God is viewed as comforting us for our losses, buy information pills both on the personal and the collective levels. People have different reactions and different ways to relate with calamity. Following the Torah’s inner dimension, we can identify four such ways, which in turn correspond to the four letters of God’s essential Name, Havayah (yud, hei, vav, and hei). We will consider them in reverse order (from the final hei, to the vav, to the higher hei, to the yud). Contemplating these will also give us deeper insight into the suffering that the Jewish people have endured throughout their history, up to and even including the Holocaust.

The first way that some people relate to suffering is with anger towards God. They look at what has happened and are angry at God whom they see as responsible for what has transpired. Their anger causes them to turn away from Him and His Torah, claiming that, “God has left the earth.” Although this unfortunate reaction cannot be condoned, their anger, misdirected as it is, actually attests to their ultimate belief that God is essentially only good. This is a very high belief in and of itself, and if they are able to see beyond their anger and return to God, they actually have the potential to reach the highest level of Divine service. The initial anger, together with the eventual return and elevation associated with this reaction, is represented with the final hei in God’s essential Name, Havayah.

Another way some people relate to a calamity is by seeing it as punishment for their sins. Maimonides writes that following every disaster that, God forbid, befalls us, we should take personal account of our sins. Relating to calamities in this manner provides an illustration of God’s rebuke, “If you treat Me happenstance, I too, will treat you happenstance.” What this rebuke actually says is that God will (at least seem to) treat us “measure for measure,” punishing us in return for our sins. But, actually, this approach attests to what is called “small-mindedness” or an immature view of our relationship with God, because it has us believe that God is just running an accounting service and for every misdemeanor He immediately strikes back. This indeed represents God’s “small countenance,” which the letter vav in His essential Name refers to.

The next level is to see how even within the harsh judgments that God sends our way there is still so much compassion. This aspect can be clearly perceived when we contemplate the abundance of amazing stories of people who were saved, often miraculously, from pending disaster. Considering the period surrounding the Temple’s destruction, the very fact that there the Jewish people were not completely wiped-out testifies to God’s mercy (He took out His fury, as it were, on the physical building that was the Temple, but spared the lives of many, allowing the people to survive). Similarly, during the Holocaust, the Nazis’ plans to destroy the Jewish population of the Holy Land, God forbid, did not progress and the Jews in the Land of Israel were spared. Even though God’s wrath spread like wildfire, nonetheless, we are still alive and breathing. Even within the devastating harsh judgments, we rejoice over God’s compassion, associated with the motherly womb (?????), the Hebrew word for which is cognate with “compassion” (????????). The mother figure corresponds to the first hei of God’s essential Name, Havayah.

The fourth and highest level (corresponding to the yud of Havayah) is to understand that God sends us woes in order to bring us to a higher level of consciousness. To better understand what it means that God seems to be absent for our own benefit, Rebbe Hillel of Paritsch offers an insightful parable involving a Rabbi and his beloved student. In the course of teaching his student Torah, the Rabbi suddenly falls silent. From the student’s point of view, it appears that his teacher is angry with him because of something he did wrong. The student’s point of view is reinforced when suddenly his teacher walks out of the room and does not return. However, Rebbe Hillel explains that the truth is that the teacher is not angry with his student but is preoccupied with a sudden spark of new insight he has received. Since the nature of such sparks of insight is to fade away back into the super-conscious and disappear altogether if they are not captured immediately and meditated upon, the teacher is forced to ignore his student for a time, forsake the current lesson, all in order to capture the insight. Actually, the Rabbi has his student in mind when doing so, since his ultimate intent is to pass the new teaching on to his beloved student. God too has acted in this way, says Rebbe Hillel. In those times when He seems to be absent from our lives, in truth, He is actually preparing a new light for us to enjoy.

From Rabbi Ginsburgh's class, 11th Av 5773

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